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We’ve Come So Far: The Last Days of Death by Audio

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We’ve Come So Far: The Last Days of Death by Audio

40.00

Death By Audio was a beloved underground venue that occupied a large warehouse space on the waterfront of Williamsburg, Brooklyn from 2005 until 2014. Within its walls were a music venue, a guitar effects pedal company, a rehearsal space / recording studio, and the home of over 10 artists and musicians. Shortly after its founders moved into the space in 2005, Williamsburg was in full swing as a hub of DIY music, cultural, and artistic activity in NYC. In a rapidly changing neighborhood transforming from affordable artist haven to tourist/shopping/dining oasis, Death By Audio was the longest lasting DIY space in Williamsburg and its closing in November 2014 not only signaled the loss of a physical space; on a broader scale, it sounded the final death knell of the neighborhood as an epicenter of creativity. The music venue part of Death By Audio was the public face of the space and it hosted thousands of concerts, giving much-needed support to local and touring bands operating outside the structure of official NYC concert venues. The space developed a reputation for nurturing the underground music community and curating shows with the best emerging bands from around the country. Throughout the years, the venue hosted a multitude of bands that went on to enjoy international acclaim, including A Place To Bury Strangers, Thee Oh Sees, Ty Segall, Future Islands, Jeff the Brotherhood and Lightning Bolt, among so many more.

Ebru Yildiz, a Turkish-born, Brooklyn-based music and portrait photographer, was a regular at the very first parties thrown at Death By Audio back in 2005, drawn in by her love of the de facto house band, A Place To Bury Strangers. Upon hearing of the venue’s imminent closure she knew she had to be there for the end, too. Yildiz was at Death By Audio almost every day and night for the last 75 days of its existence, photographing not only the raucous concerts but also the quieter, more intimate scenes from the daily lives of the people who worked and lived in the space. The result is not only a visual documentation of the final days of one of the longest-standing, most vital venues in the DIY community of early 2000s NYC, but also a window into the dedication and hard work that goes into creating a space whose primary focus is to nurture artistic expression and fellowship. 

- Hardcover, 200 pages, 8"(H) X 12" (W)
- Over 200 black and white photographs
- Introduction by Bill Pearis, foreword by Mark Kleeback
- Exclusive oral history of Death By Audio and its last days as told by Oliver Ackermann, Matt Conboy, Edan Wilber and other staff and residents. 

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Death By Audio was a beloved underground venue that occupied a large warehouse space on the waterfront of Williamsburg, Brooklyn from 2005 until 2014. Within its walls were a music venue, a guitar effects pedal company, a rehearsal space / recording studio, and the home of over 10 artists and musicians. Shortly after its founders moved into the space in 2005, Williamsburg was in full swing as a hub of DIY music, cultural, and artistic activity in NYC. In a rapidly changing neighborhood transforming from affordable artist haven to tourist/shopping/dining oasis, Death By Audio was the longest lasting DIY space in Williamsburg and its closing in November 2014 not only signaled the loss of a physical space; on a broader scale, it sounded the final death knell of the neighborhood as an epicenter of creativity. The music venue part of Death By Audio was the public face of the space and it hosted thousands of concerts, giving much-needed support to local and touring bands operating outside the structure of official NYC concert venues. The space developed a reputation for nurturing the underground music community and curating shows with the best emerging bands from around the country. Throughout the years, the venue hosted a multitude of bands that went on to enjoy international acclaim, including A Place To Bury Strangers, Thee Oh Sees, Ty Segall, Future Islands, Jeff the Brotherhood and Lightning Bolt, among so many more.

Ebru Yildiz, a Turkish-born, Brooklyn-based music and portrait photographer, was a regular at the very first parties thrown at Death By Audio back in 2005, drawn in by her love of the de facto house band, A Place To Bury Strangers. Upon hearing of the venue’s imminent closure she knew she had to be there for the end, too. Yildiz was at Death By Audio almost every day and night for the last 75 days of its existence, photographing not only the raucous concerts but also the quieter, more intimate scenes from the daily lives of the people who worked and lived in the space. The result is not only a visual documentation of the final days of one of the longest-standing, most vital venues in the DIY community of early 2000s NYC, but also a window into the dedication and hard work that goes into creating a space whose primary focus is to nurture artistic expression and fellowship. 

- Hardcover, 200 pages, 8"(H) X 12" (W)
- Over 200 black and white photographs
- Introduction by Bill Pearis, foreword by Mark Kleeback
- Exclusive oral history of Death By Audio and its last days as told by Oliver Ackermann, Matt Conboy, Edan Wilber and other staff and residents.